Research

  • Global conservation priorities

    The ability to adequately protect the natural capital largely depends on the capacity to identify gaps, recognize needs, take action and evaluate the efficiency of conservation initiatives

    The ability to adequately protect the natural capital largely depends on the capacity to identify gaps, recognize needs, take action and evaluate the efficiency of conservation initiatives. In a dynamic and uncertain world, the necessity to identify and account for potential drivers of change, develop flexible conservation schemes, and prioritize management efforts could contribute towards the efficient protection of global biodiversity and ecosystem services. Our active areas of research include:

     

    • Developing of integrated biological and socioeconomic models
    • Prioritizing conservation efforts
    • Assessing the impacts of spatial, temporal and administrative scales upon conservation initiatives and efficiency
    • Developing methodological frameworks for supporting European Union conservation policy
    • Incorporating Natural security risks into conservation and management schemes

     

    Indicative publications

    • Halley, J.M., Monokrousos, N., Mazaris A.D., Newmark, W.D., Vokou, D. 2016. Dynamics of extinction debt across five taxonomic groups. Nature Communications 7, 12283
    • Mazaris, A.D., Papanikolaou, A.D., Barbet-Massin, M., Kallimanis A.S., Jiguet, F., Schmeller, D., Pantis, J.D. 2013.Evaluating the connectivity of a protected areas’ network under the prism of global change: The efficiency of the European Natura 2000 network for four birds of prey. Plos One1371/journal. pone.0059640
    • Mazaris, A. D., Kallimanis, A. S., Tzanopoulos, J., Sgardelis, S. P., Pantis, J. D. 2010. Can we predict the number of plant species from the richness of a few common genera, families or orders? Journal of Applied Ecology 47, 662-670

  • Efficiency of protected area networks

    Protected areas (PAs) represent the main tool of modern society to mitigate the loss of biological diversity, thereby maintaining ecosystem functionality and services

    Protected areas (PAs) represent the main tool of modern society to mitigate the loss of biological diversity, thereby maintaining ecosystem functionality and services. The new Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity promotes the expansion of the global coverage of PAs, through Aichi Target 11, to reach at least 17% of land and 10% of marine waters by 2020. Undoubtedly, in human dominated regions, the establishment of PAs is challenging due to multiple human uses of land and sea, while the efficiency of the current PAs network has been largely questioned.

     

    The goal of this research area is to contribute to the ongoing discussion on the following topics:

     

    • How efficient is the coverage and distribution of current PAs and priority regions for expanding the global PAs network?
    • How could we ensure the coherence and ecological sufficiency of protected areas?
    • How efficient are networks of PAs in conserving biodiversity targets under land use and climate change? Could these networks safeguard coherence and resilience to these threats?
    • How could we advance systematic conservation planning tools to satisfy alternative criteria, ensuring an optimal spatial conservation prioritisation?

     

    Indicative publications

    • Mazaris, A. D., Almpanidou, V., Wallace, B. P., Pantis, J. D., & Schofield, G. 2014. A global gap analysis of sea turtle protection coverage. Biological Conservation 173, 17-23
    • Vokou, D., Dimitrakopoulos, P. G., Jones, N., Damialis, A., Monokrousos, N., Pantis, J. D., Mazaris A.D., & Natura-2000 Committee 2014. Ten years of co-management in Greek protected areas: an evaluation. Biodiversity and Conservation 23, 2833-2855
    • Tsianou, M. A., Mazaris, A. D., Kallimanis, A. S., Deligioridi, P. S. K., Apostolopoulou, E.,  Pantis, J. D. 2013. Identifying the criteria underlying the political decision for the prioritization of the Greek Natura 2000 conservation network. Biological Conservation 166, 103-110

  • Challenges for marine mega-fauna

    We work at the interface between global change ecology, population dynamics and evolutionary biology.

    We work at the interface between global change ecology, population dynamics and evolutionary biology. Our active areas of research include:

     

    • Investigating the efficiency of sea turtle adaptive mechanisms to climate change
    • Examining recent adaptive responses to local conditions vs distant evolutionary events on structuring the climatic niche of sea turtles
    • Estimating population viability and global trends
    • Prioritizing global conservation efforts and identifying risk hotspots for sea turtles

     

    Indicative publications

    • Hays, G. C., Mazaris, A. D., Schofield, G. 2014. Different male vs. female breeding periodicity helps mitigate offspring sex ratio skews in sea turtles. Frontiers in Marine Science 1, 43
    • Mazaris, A.D., Kallimanis, A.S., Pantis, J.D., Hays, G.C. 2013. Phenological response of sea turtles to environmental variation across species’ northern range. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 280, 20122397
    • Mazaris, A.D., Matsinos, Y.G., Pantis, J.D. 2009. Evaluating the impacts of coastal squeeze on sea turtle nesting.Ocean and Coastal Management 52, 139-145

  • Climate change ecology

    The climate of the planet is changing, affecting the distribution, abundance, dynamics, behaviour and physiology of populations and communities.

    The climate of the planet is changing, affecting the distribution, abundance, dynamics, behaviour and physiology of populations and communities. Therefore, anticipating the future under the prism of climate change represents one of the main challenges that modern communities have to deal with. Recent and ongoing questions in this area include:

     

    • Ecological responses to climate change
    • Prediction of climate change impacts on species distributions and population dynamics
    • Levels of climate change, climate change velocity and rate of species adaptation

     

    Indicative publications

    • Almpanidou, A., Schofield, G.,Kallimanis, A.S.,  Türkozan, O., Hays, G.C., Mazaris A.D.2016 .Using climatic suitability thresholds to identify past, present and future population viability. Ecological Indicators 71, 551-556
    • Mazaris A.D.,Vokou, D., Almpanidou, V., Türkozan, O., Sgardelis, S.P. 2015. Low conservatism of the climatic niche of sea turtles and implications for predicting future distributions. Ecosphere 6, 1-12
    • Lehsten, V., Sykes, M. T., Scott, A. V., Tzanopoulos, J., Kallimanis, A., Mazaris, A., Verburg, P.H., Schulp, C. J.E., Potts, S.G. Vogiatzakis, I. 2015. Disentangling the effects of land-use change, climate and CO2 on projected future European habitat types. Global Ecology and Biogeography 24, 653-663

Close Scroll